Art Craft

Carved and Embroidered Leaves by Hillary Fayle

January 22, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Hillary Fayle (previously here and here) slices and stitches patterns into found leaves, producing elegant designs that strike a delicate balance between natural specimens and the human hand. The works range from minimal tweaks to individual leaves to more involved patterns that link several in one embroidery. Fayle hopes each piece is an encouragement to look at nature a little closer and consider the potential for harmony in objects often overlooked.

“I want to salvage and revive our connection to the natural world,” explains Fayle in an artist statement on her website.  “…Both tender and ruthless, this intricate and sensitive work implies that our relationship to nature is both tenuously fragile and infinitely complex.”

You can see more of Fayle’s leaf embroidery, as well as some new experiments with snake scales, on her Instagram and website.

 

 



Art Food Photography

Foods Distorted Through Liquid and Glass in Photographs by Suzanne Saroff

January 22, 2018

Christopher Jobson

All photos © Suzanne Saroff.

In her ongoing series titled Perspective, photographer Suzanne Saroff creates fractured and skewed images of common foods as seen through vessels filled with water and glass objects. The images play with concepts of light and shadow resulting in distorted still lifes that appear almost like digital glitches. “With tools and techniques such as refraction, directional light, and bold colors, my photographs give everyday items alternate visual avenues of expression,” shares Saroff. “Taking shape via shadows or fragmentations, my subjects often become more than the singular and expected version of themselves.”

Saroff was born Missoula, Montana and now lives and works in New York where she shoots for a variety of brands. You can follow more of her photography on Instagram. (via Booooooom)

 

 



Art

Walk Inside a Warehouse-Sized Kaleidoscopic Painting by Katharina Grosse

January 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

The newest work by German artist Katharina Grosse encompasses an entire warehouse, transforming its raw interior into a soft maze of kaleidoscopic color. The installation, titled The Horse Trotted Another Couple of Metres, Then it Stopped, responds to the architecture of Sydney’s contemporary art center Carriageworks, filling the industrial space with nearly 90,000 square feet of painted fabric.

“I was fascinated by the thought of folding space,” explained Grosse in a statement about the work. “I was interested in taking this vast surface and shrinking it by folding or, actually, hiding the entirety of what’s there. I understand a painting as something that, as we view it, travels through us and realigns our connections with the world.”

To produce the piece Grosse first suspended the multitude of fabric from Carriageworks’ ceiling, creating a series of drapes and folds. The artist then used a spray gun to paint the work in a series of gestural strokes, creating an immersive site-specific environment that obscures the historic building’s architecture in a dense mass of swirling color.

The work was mounted as a part of Sydney Festival 2018, and is on view through April 8, 2018. You can view more of Grosse’s large-scale paintings (including this 2016 in situ installation at Rockaway Beach) on her website.  (via Juxtapoz)

 

 



Art

A Relaxing Video Demonstrates the Detailed Steps of Making Paper by Hand

January 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Chinese vlogger Li Ziqi films her videos in the serene countryside of China, demonstrating step-by-step instructions for making traditional recipes such as fresh pomelo honey and Lanzhou beef noodles. In one of her most recent videos Li presents the days long process of traditional Chinese paper making, a process which can be traced back to the early years of the Han Dynasty sometime within the 2nd century BC.

The soothing video weaves together the necessary steps for making paper from scratch. During the video Li strictly adheres to the ancient process, using only basic tools such as fire and a mortar and pestle to transform the raw bark. After cutting down a few trees for the paper, Li then cuts and mashes the trunks into pulp, solidifying the consistency of the solution through several rounds of soaking and drying. You can watch the entirety of the demonstration above (along with a surprising twist ending), and view more of Li’s relaxing instructionals on her Youtube channel. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 



Art Illustration

Miniature Paintings on Tea Bags by Ruby Silvious

January 18, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Some of us may give our used tea bags a second life by squeezing an extra steep out of them, but Ruby Silvious takes things a step further by using the thin paper as a canvas for miniature paintings. Silvious mirrors the simple ritual of tea drinking in quiet paintings that show slices of everyday life, like laundry drying and cats looking out the window.

The artist began her initial year-long series of paintings in January 2015. Since then, Silvious has compiled that year into a book, and traveled to Japan and southern France for month-long sessions of tea drinking and painting. Her work is included in a group show “Deemed a Canvas” at Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia, which opens on January 26th. You can see more of Silvious’ work on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

The Surreal Objects of Nancy Fouts

January 17, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Everyday objects take an unusual turn in Nancy Fouts‘ bizarre sculptures. Playing with unexpected combinations of violence and peace, the natural and manmade, interiors and exteriors, Fouts challenges viewers to rethink the categories we habitually place different objects in. The American-born, London-based artist studied at the Chelsea School of Art and the Royal College of Art. Prints of some works are available on Artsy and you can meet Fouts in the video below by Black Rat Projects.

 

 



Design Photography

New Charming Mosaic and Tile Floors Captured by Photographer Sebastian Erras

January 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Sebastian Erras (previously here and here) captures diverse and fanciful mosaic floors throughout Europe and Cuba, placing all of his downward-facing finds on his Instagram @parisianfloors. Erras began his project focused on tiled patterns throughout Paris, but began expanding outward as he noticed equally breathtaking floors in cities such as Barcelona and London. Included here are two perspectives of the sea-themed floor of the restaurant Le Bon Pecheur in Paris, a shot of a friendly looking crab and a fantastically rendered conical shell.

You can see a wider range of Erras’s interior photography and other mosaic-covered floors on his portfolio site.

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Advanced Yoga Joes