New Miniature Anatomical Sculptures and Jewelry Carved From Pearls by Shinji Nakaba 

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Shinji Nakaba (previously) is a master of carving carefully into miniature objects, creating skulls and other anatomical forms from pearls no larger than the end of a finger tip. Nakaba considers these works “wearable sculptures,” as each pearl takes the form of a ring, necklace, or pin. Although he uses precious metals and stones for his high-end jewelry, he is not against mixing in more common materials. Nakaba has been known to also incorporate aluminum from beer cans and trimmings from plastic bottles.

“I’m dealing with all materials equally no matter how precious they are,” said Nakaba. “I bring out their hidden talents and beauty and they are being re-born as treasure.”

You can see more of his wearable works on his online shop.

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Gravity-Defying Shoes Installed on the Streets of London by Pejac 

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All photos by Gary Van Handley.

For his first ever public intervention in London, street artist Pejac (previously) created four installations of sneakers hanging from lamposts with a slight twist: the shoes dangle up instead of down. The head-scratching installations titled “Downside Up” can be found around East London and are a teaser ahead of a solo show that opens next month.

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Double Exposure Tattoos by Andrey Lukovnikov 

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Tattoo artist Andrey Lukovnikov has been producing a series of tattoos reminiscent of multiple exposure photography where several images are superimposed to create a single image—or perhaps the digital equivlent, clipping masks as used in Photoshop or Illustrator. Colorfully lush backdrops of flowers are ‘clipped’ by the outlines of large insects or birds, creating a visual window into another scene. The Wroclaw-based tattooer shares photos and videos of his latest pieces on Facebook. (via Illusion)

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Floral Elements Embroidered Directly on Antique Soldiers’ Helmets 

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“Kill for Peace” (2016), soldier’s helmets, sweaters. Cross-stitch, drilling, Industrial needle punching. All images by Vidmantas Ilciukas.

Lithuanian artist Severija Inčirauskaitė-Kriaunevičienė (previously here, here, and here) uses cross-stitch embroidery to soften metal objects that seem materially opposed to the craft, having previously worked with car doors, spoons, pots, pans, and shovels. In her latest exhibition “Kill for Peace,” Inčirauskaitė-Kriaunevičienė used helmets from armies of various countries, stitching roses, violets, and thorns onto their surfaces. These helmets were presented at the contemporary art fair Art Vilnius 2016 where she was awarded for best installation at the fair. You can see more embroidered works on her website.

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Halo Effect: Swimmers in Thailand Surrounded by Clouds of Bioluminescent Phytoplankton 

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When photographer Will Strathmann was recently in Krabi, Thailand, he decided to head out during a full moon to witness the effects of bioluminescent phytoplankton in the nearby Andaman Sea. His curiosity was rewarded by a small group of swimmers who were causing the microscopic organisms to light up by agitating the water around them. The result was this amazing shot. You can see more of Strathmann’s photography on Instagram. (via NatGeo)

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A Photo Series Featuring an Oversized Dachshund and Her Owner Exploring Brooklyn 

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Writer, photographer, illustrator, and director Mitch Boyer got the idea to Photoshop his tiny dachshund Vivian to an enormous scale after wanting to see her portrayed the same size of her mammoth personality. The idea was so entertaining he decided to turn the series of digitally manipulated images into a children’s book titled “Vivian the Dog Moves to Brooklyn” which depicts the pair’s own move to the city just a couple of years prior.

Knowing that each year over 5.5 million kids between the ages of one and nine move to a new home in the United States, Boyer decided to format the book as a tool to help children feel more comfortable during periods of relocation and transition. The 32-page book will feature Vivian as a six-foot-tall version of herself, adjusting to life in Brooklyn alongside Boyer and meeting some furry friends along the way.

The project is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter. You can follow Boyer and Vivian’s real day-to-day adventures on Instagram and Facebook. (via Designboom)

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