Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal (previously) is well-known for his creation and placement of miniature cement figures in public places around the world as part of an ongoing series called Cement Eclipses. While the meaning behind each tiny sculpture is intentionally ambiguous, it’s impossible to look at each piece without imagining a story. The pieces often appear in scenes of mourning or despair, as part of what Cordal says is commentary on humankind’s disregard for nature and as foreshadowing of potential consequences. From his artist statement:

Isaac Cordal is sympathetic toward his little people and you can empathize with their situations, their leisure time, their waiting for buses and even their more tragic moments such as accidental death, suicide or family funerals. The sculptures can be found in gutters, on top of buildings, on top of bus shelters; in many unusual and unlikely places.

These new skeletal works are part of a 2013 series he created in Chiapas, Mexico, and he also had work this summer at ArtScape 2014 in Sweden. You can see more over on Facebook. (via Supersonic)

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Sponsor // The Art of the Picture Book

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Offer expires August 4, 2014 at midnight MT.Sponsor // The Art of the Picture Book sponsor

Residents of Rio de Janeiro Take to the Rooftops to Battle with Kites

For many of us, the idea of flying a kite involves stopping by a convenience store to purchase an inexpensive plastic kite emblazoned with a movie character, and heading over to the local park to launch it into the sky where it’s promptly swallowed by a tree. But for residents living in the crowded favelas of Rio de Janeiro, where resources and park space is scarce, flying kites is do or die. People of all ages take to the rooftops to fight with homemade kites using strings coated with wax and powdered glass in an attempt to cut the strings of competitors. Entire battles are fought between neighboring “turfs,” where real life conflicts between people and neighborhoods are settled through kite wars.

Filmmaker Guilherme Tensol, in collaboration with sports magazine Victory and Brazilian production company Mosquito Project, produced this stylized documentary short titled Kite Fight for the New York Times leading up to the World Cup a few weeks ago.

Residents of Rio de Janeiro Take to the Rooftops to Battle with Kites kites documentary Brazil

Residents of Rio de Janeiro Take to the Rooftops to Battle with Kites kites documentary Brazil

Residents of Rio de Janeiro Take to the Rooftops to Battle with Kites kites documentary Brazil

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This Is What Happens When You Attach a GoPro Camera to a Moving Car Wheel

Though we may be rapidly heading toward peak GoPro, and the number of unique scenarios where the tiny video camera is used to film something is dwindling, gems like these still persist. For his Video Sketchbook class at the University of Wisconsin, Ryan Fox attached a camera to his car wheel while driving aroud at night, and this is the dizzying result. This should probably come with a list of seizure/vertigo/hypnotism warnings. (via Vimeo)

Update: Hey, if you liked this, also check out Paul Octavious’ photo series of spinning vinyl, Grandpa’s Records (scroll right).

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Photographer Captures Perfect Shadow of Mt. Fuji at Sunrise

Photographer Captures Perfect Shadow of Mt. Fuji at Sunrise shadows Mt. Fuji mountains Japan

While climbing Mt. Fuji in 2012, photographer Kris J B managed to capture this crystal clear shot of the mountain’s shadow at sunrise. The 12,388 ft. Fuji is notoriously shy and is often obscured by low hanging clouds or fog. This was the photographer’s 4th attempt to climb the mountain, an ascent in 2011 left him with a tantalizing, but ultimately unsatisfactory photograph of the mountain’s perfectly triangular shadow stretching out toward the horizon. In 2012 he arrived prepared and returned with this amazing shot.

After posting it online two years ago, K B’s image spread like wildfire and he quickly lost control of his rights. The photo was used widely without his permission, a story he recently shared with PetaPixel. K B now lives and works in England, and you can follow more of his photography on his website and over on Facebook. Image courtesy the photographer.

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Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books
Lucie Houdkova

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books
Andrée-Anne Dupuis-Bourret

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books
Marine Coutroutsios

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books
Alexander Korzer-Robinson

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books
Geraldine Gonzalez

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books
Mia Pearlman

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books
Cecilia Levy

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books

Just published by Gingko Press, Paper Play is a new 256-page book exploring the use of paper in contemporary art and design. The book features no less than 82 designers and artists who use paper in sculptures, jewelry, street art, installations and everything else you can imagine. I started listing out all the artists we’ve featured here on the Colossal who are included in the book, but it got a bit unwieldy after a dozen. Pick it up here.

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Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera (caddis larva) building case (studio view), 1980-2000. Material: Gold, pearls, turquoise. Length: 2.5 cm. Photographer: Frédéric Delpech. Image courtesy of the artist and Art:Concept gallery, Paris and MONA Museum of Old and New Art.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold

Right now, in almost every river in the world, some 12,000 different species of caddisfly larvae wriggle and crawl through sediment, twigs, and rocks in an attempt to build temporary aquatic cocoons. To do this, the small, slow-moving creatures excrete silk from salivary glands near their mouths which they use like mortar to stick together almost every available material into a cozy tube. A few weeks later a fully developed caddisfly emerges and almost immediately flies away.

After first learning about caddisflies, self-taught (and self-professed amateur) artist Hubert Duprat had a thought. Had a caddisfly ever naturally encountered a fleck of gold in a river and used it to build a home? And then one step further: what if a caddisfly had only gold and other precious stones or jewels to work with?

Trichoptères, French for the scientific name of the caddisfly, is Duprat’s answer to that question. For years the artist has been collaborating with the tiny insects, providing them small aquariums of gold, turquoise and pearls that the the larvae readily use to construct their temporary homes. Regardless of how creepy crawly you might find the insects, it’s impossible to deny the strange beauty of the final product, tiny gold sculptures held together with silk. Encountering them void of any context, one would assume they were constructed by a jeweler.

Duprat currently has a solo exhibition at the Museum of Old and New Art in Tasmania which runs through July 28th, and it should be notced thath is work with caddisflies is only one small aspect of his art practice.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera larva with case, 1980-2000. Material: gold and pearls. Dimension: 0.5 x 1.9 cm. Photographer: Frédéric Delpech. Image courtesy of the artist and Art:Concept gallery, Paris and MONA Museum of Old and New Art.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera larva with case, 1980-2000. Material: gold and pearls. Dimension: 0.5 x 1.9 cm. Photographer: Frédéric Delpech. Image courtesy of the artist and Art:Concept gallery, Paris and MONA Museum of Old and New Art.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera (caddis larva) case. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera (caddis larva) case on pedestal. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera (caddis larva) case. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera (caddis larva) case on pedestal. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera (caddis larva) case. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera (caddis larva) case on pedestal. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold

A huge thank you to the Museum of Old and New Art and photographer Fabrice Gousset for providing the images for this post. If you liked this, don’t miss the work of (via ARTREBELS)

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