Minimalist Aquariums Filled With 3D Printed Flora by Designer Haruka Misawa 

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All images via Haruka Misawa.

Designer and founder of Misawa Design Institute, Haruka Misawa (previously), has designed a series of minimal aquariums titled “Waterscapes” that include 3D printed objects inspired by undersea plant life. These works mimic coral and other aquatic flora that small fish use as hiding places, yet are all manufactured digitally. The objects are ones that would normal topple or crumble because of their own weight, yet because of their underwater location are able to exist as buoyant additions to the aesthetically pleasing fish homes.

Within the series Misawa has also designed bubbles of air within the aquariums that allow plants to thrive at the center of her creations. These meta environments appear like miniature fish bowls within larger aquariums, with plants floating at the top of the inner enclosures. These works were displayed recently in Taiwan in an exhibition titled “Waterscape” and you can see them in action in the video below. (via Design Milk)

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Ingenious Hand Puppet Capable of Pointing, Grabbing, and Talking 

Puppet designer Barnaby Dixon spent the last 1.5 years developing this amazing little hand puppet that includes mechanisms traditionally found on a marionette. When operated using two hands the figure seems almost lifelike and is capable of pointing, grasping small objects, and even talking. In another video Dixon experiments with the puppet’s various dance moves. (via Neatorama)

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Extremely Slow Guitar Playing Sounds Like a Violin When Sped Up 

Here’s a clever but of instrumentation and video work. Musician Steve-san Onotera, aka the Samurai Guitarist, recorded himself playing the Beatles’ Here Comes the Sun at an excruciatingly slow pace—almost 30 minutes to play the song once. He then sped the recording up 20 times and played it back, creating a sound that could easily be mistaken for some kind of modulated violin. Shooting during a sunrise was a nice touch. (via Kottke)

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Serpentine Tattoos That Weave Black & White Ink by Mirko Sata 

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All images via @mirkosata

Milan-based tattoo artist Mirko Sata focuses on serpentine designs, snakes that twist around his clients’ arms, hands, and legs. The snakes he creates are typically done in just two shades— stark white and deep black. Layering and curling these creatures around each other, Mirko Sata produces a sort of yin and yang, placing opposite colors together with a force that seems to transcend traditional black and white tattoos.

Mirko Sata tattoos at Satatttvision in Milan, and you can see more of his designs on Instagram and Satatttvision’s Tumblr. (via @thefoxisblack)

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A Short Film Detailing the Miniature Replication of Nix + Gerber’s Post-Apocalyptic Studio 

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“Library” (2007), all images via The Drawing Room

Since 2005, artist Lori Nix and partner Kathleen Gerber have been producing dioramas that depict post-apocalyptic environments, everyday scenes that give the audience a glimpse of their world once nature has been left to take over. Nearly everything within the scenes is fabricated by the two under the name Nix+Gerber, with each scene taking approximately seven months from start to the final photograph. This means that the two take approximately two photographs a year, spending the bulk of their practice on miniature reproduction.

When deciding the last piece to produce for the body of work “The City,” Nix+Gerber decided to look inward. They choose to replicate their own studio, titled “The Living Room” (2013), which Nix explains actually looks like the end of the world, a disaster scene to fit within the dystopian series. For this particular project they had to work in an extremely meta fashion, scanning each CD that sat on their shelves and reproducing an even smaller replica of a subway train car that was sitting in their studio when they started production.

“It’s the little details that really make the scene come alive,” said Nix. “The fan in the back window, the paracords going everywhere, and the little items on the table.”

Despite the fact that most of Nix’s practice is focused on creating the props for each shoot, she still labels herself as a photographer rather than sculptor. “I’m not the type of photographer that is going to go out and find things to photograph,” said Nix. “I am going to create things to photograph.”

While crafting “The Living Room,” The Drawing Room produced a short documentary about Nix+Gerber’s practice which you can see below. You can also read more about the artists’ work on their blog, and see more of their miniature scenes on their Instagram and Facebook.

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“Living Room” (2013)

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“Church” (2009)

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“Control Room” (2010)

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“Anatomy Classroom” (2012)

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“Laundromat at Night” (2008)

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“The Subway” (2012)

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“Chinese Take-Out” (2013)

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“Museum of Art” (2010)

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“Beauty Shop” (2010)

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Artist JR Makes the Iconic Louvre Pyramid ‘Disappear’ Into the Museum’s Palace Facade 

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Just a few hours ago, French street artist JR completed work on his latest public artwork, a large photographic piece that wraps the iconic glass pyramid outside the Musée du Louvre causing it to disappear against the palace facade. The piece is part of an event titled “JR au Louvre,” and is comprised of photographic prints of the museum itself adhered to the glass exterior. When viewed from just the right vantage point it creates an illusion of the pyramid seeming to vanish.

JR is known for his large-scale public flyposting of black and white photographs, most commonly of people’s faces. While the pyramid piece is clearly visible outdoors, the exhibition will also involve a 24-hour event on May 28-29th. The happening involves a series of films, workshops, a music performance by Nils Frahm, and a dance performance by the New York City Ballet. You can see the full schedule of events here, and some work-in-progress photos on JR’s Instagram. (via Laughing Squid)

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