Digital Artist Mike Winkelmann Creates Daily Conceptual Illustrations Spanning Nearly a Decade 


For over 9 years, graphic designer and digital artist Mike Winkelmann (aka Beeple) has endeavored to create a new digital illustration every single day. From abstract blobs of metallic goo to fully-realized science fiction landscapes, Winkelmann shares every creation he makes in an uninterrupated stream online via Tumblr, Facebook and elsewhere. While some pieces are more successful than others, he says the daily act of creation is less about producing consistently solid work, and more about working through ideas, quickly working through the bad ones, and learning new tools or methods. The vast majority of what he imagines simply defies explanation or genre, and themes change dramatically from image to image. Winkelmann shares more about his process and tools in this interview with iO9. (via Behance)









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A Mass of Tangled Red Yarn Unravels from a Loom to Overtake a Brazilian Chapel 


Tatiana Blass, “Penelope” (2011), carpet loom, wool yarn, chenille at the Chapel of Morumbi. Photos by Everton Ballardin

In 2011, Brazilian artist Tatiana Blass pierced the walls of a Sao Paulo chapel with large masses of red yarn, letting the bright material trail into the surrounding grasses, landscape, and trees. The installation, titled Penelope, was named after Odysseus’s wife in Homer’s Odyssey, a character who kept herself away from suitors while he was at war by weaving a burial shroud by day, and secretly taking pieces of it apart at night.

Inside the chapel the work continued with a 45-foot-long carpet leading to a loom into which it was stuck. Immaculate on one side of the loom and in pieces on the other, strings of the dismantled rug traveled outside of the chapel through preexisting holes that made their way into the yard. The piece, just like the epic poem, leaves us to wonder whether the work is in a state of construction or unraveling, if the carpet is being built, or slowly torn apart. (via Design Milk)







Penelope, before and after 6 months

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Explore the Role of Dynamic Media in Communication Design at MassArt (Sponsor) 


Image: Andrew Ringler: Music Sequencing, 2016

The MFA: Design (Dynamic Media Institute) at MassArt explores the role and possibilities of dynamic media in communication design. Each student’s vision for design develops into an original body of ideas and fresh practice.

Students come to DMI from diverse backgrounds: architects, industrial designers, programmers, engineers, filmmakers, musicians, anthropologists, photographers, fine artists, and graphic designers. They come from all over the world, including Central and South America, Asia, Europe and the United States. The student body reflects the program’s cross-disciplinary approach to dynamic media design.

Admission to DMI is highly selective. The 60-credit MFA: Design program is offered in three tracks: a two-year track in four semesters; a three-year track in five semesters; or a three-year track in six semesters, the difference being the distribution of elective credits. DMI also offers a one-year fellowship “non-matriculating track” to which candidates are accepted based on specific project proposals.

For more details and application info, visit

Airportraits: Composite Flight Path Photos Capture Planes Landing and Departing from Worldwide Airports 


For his ambitious Airportraits series, photographer Mike Kelley sets up camp outside of airports and meticulously photographs planes as they takeoff and land—shooting thousands of photos per location. He then uses Photoshop to isolate the planes and combines the images into the composite “portraits” you see here. Each image tells a fascinating story about the nature of each airport and the many unseen variables that affect the flight paths of each airport like noise regulations, plane size, and air traffic patterns.

When he initially began the project two years ago, Kelley’s plan was relatively straightforward: fly to 10 or so cities around the globe and spend a day or two at each airport scouting the location, taking photos, and then off to the next destination. This plan worked well in Europe where the weather was consistent, but soon he faced the reality that seasonal weather in places like Japan was completely unpredictable. In Tokyo he left without a single usable photo after days of trying. Some cities he had to return to 2-3 times in hopes the weather would improve, and in other places it would take nearly a week to photograph enough planes to make an image.

During editing, most planes are left “as is” in the location they appeared in the sky while taking off. Planes in the processes of landing proved to be more difficult. “For the landing images, I did take slight artistic liberty with the position of the aircraft, because in real life the planes follow a very specific glidepath to the touchdown point,” Kelley shares with Colossal. “If I hadn’t moved them, all the planes would be directly on top of one another and there’d be no real dynamics or movement in the image.”

In all, Kelley created 19 composite images you can explore on his website, all of which are available as limited edition fine art prints. You can see more of his photography on Instagram. (via Boing Boing, Kottke)










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New Wearable Textile Sculptures by Artist Mariko Kusumoto 


Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA

Artist Mariko Kusumoto (previously) continues to amaze us with her ability to turn textiles into delicate orbs that can be worn as necklaces, brooches, and rings. While the artworks are often inspired by patterns or shapes found in nature, the pieces are left intentionally ambiguous as a way to engage the imagination. She shares in her artist statement:

My work reflects various, observable phenomena that stimulate my mind and senses; they can be natural or man-made. I ‘reorganize’ them into a new presentation that can be described as surreal, amusing, graceful, or unexpected. A playful, happy atmosphere pervades my work. I always like to leave some space for the viewer’s imagination; I hope the viewer experiences discovery, surprise, and wonder through my work.

Most of the pieces scene here are constructed with delicate polyester fabrics, a material that is both flexible in its application and extremely durable, allowing for her lightweight designs. You can see more of Kusumoto’s fiber explorations and metalwork at Mobilia Gallery and on her website.


Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA


Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA


Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA









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Gritty Low-Fi Animations of Surreal Creatures by Ori Toor 


Tel-Aviv based illustrator and animator Ori Toor has been cranking out some super unusual animations on his Tumblr titled Looopism. The quirky worm-like characters seem to occupy an unusual space between playful and unsettling, with a dash of mystery as they emerge and recede into darkness. The low-fi texture applied to each piece also provides a unique atmospheric quality that also highlights his improvisational approach to illustration as he works without sketches or plans. You can see more of his work on Instagram. (via It’s Nice That)







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