Photography

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Photography

An Examination of the Color Black in Gorgeous Portraits by Yannis Davy Guibinga

May 14, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Images from the series "The Darkest Colour," photographed by Yannis Davy Guibinga, featuring Tania Fines and Madjou Diallo, and with bodypainting by Jean Guy Leclerc. All images via Yannis Davy Guibinga.

Images from the series “The Darkest Colour,” photographed by Yannis Davy Guibinga, featuring Tania Fines and Madjou Diallo, and with bodypainting by Jean Guy Leclerc. All images via Yannis Davy Guibinga.

Self-taught Gabonese photographer Yannis Davy Guibinga is known for portraits that highlight the diversity of cultures and identities in the African diaspora. His works are often richly hued, with subjects positioned against bright gradient backgrounds or adorned in warm tones.

In his project The Darkest Colour however, Guibinga moves away from his multi-colored photo shoots to focus entirely on the color black and its relationship to darkness, mourning, and death. The series is set in front of a matte black background and features two nude models whose skin has also been painted black. The works seek to unpack the negative aspects of the both the color and its symbolism.

“Black is generally the colour associated with tragedy, death, and mourning, and the act of passing away is considered to be a tragedy in many cultures,” Guibinga tells Colossal. “‘The Darkest Colour’ seeks to redefine association of black and death with tragedy and sadness by representing the act of passing away as more of a relaxing experience.”

The 22-year-old photographer is currently a student in professional photography at Marsan College in Montreal. You can see more of his portraits, like his series 2050 which explores the future of fashion from a black woman’s perspective, on his website and Instagram. (via WideWalls)

Images from the series "The Darkest Colour, "photographed by Yannis Davy Guibinga, featuring Tania Fines and Madjou Diallo, and with bodypainting by Jean Guy Leclerc. All images via Yannis Davy Guibinga.

 

 



Photography

Swirling Star Trails Captured Over the Namib Desert by Daniel Kordan

May 8, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Russian photographer Daniel Kordan is a master of photographing the cosmos. In 2016 we covered his journey to the Salar de Uyuni, where he captured millions of brilliantly hued stars reflected in the world’s largest salt flat. Recently, Kordan returned from a trip to Namibia where he mapped swirling trails of stars above the Deadvlei, a white clay pan speckled with the 900-year-old tree skeletons, and other sites across the Namib desert.

The images feature vortexes of multi-colored stars streaked across the sky like post-impressionist paintings. The Milky Way’s warm and cool tones intermix to create a kaleidoscopic vision of the sky above, and illuminate the barren desert landscape below. To capture such images yourself, Kordan suggests creating a time lapse with a wide angle lens, and utilizing an app like PhotoPills which allows you to easily predict the position of the stars.

You can see more of Kordan’s exploration through Namibia in the images below, and view his photographs from other locations across the globe on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Photography

Dystopian Images Explore a Foggy Irish Town Drenched in Aquamarine Light

May 7, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Adrian Wojtas‘ untitled photographic series captures a dystopian glimpse of Navan, Ireland in a deep fog. The nighttime images are devoid of human life, and are each cast in an aquamarine glow from the surrounding streetlights. The included works were shot over the course of two consecutive nights in the Irish town, however Wojtas’ goal is to expand the series to include a variety of locations which will meld to form a similar atmosphere.

“For each shot, I tried to stay away from including objects that would give away the location, as well as minimized the inclusion of identifiable subjects such as cars or people,” Wojtas tells Colossal. “I didn’t want the images to seem familiar to anyone looking at them.”

The multidisciplinary creative also works in design and film, and currently splits his time between Dublin and Meath, Ireland. You can see more of Wojtas’ images, including this series of transit-based photographs, on his Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Art Craft Photography

Joyful Embroidered Photographs Embellished with Colorful Floral Motifs by Aline Brant

May 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Aline Brant celebrates people of varying ages and genders in her lovely embroidered photographs. Brant starts with a black and white photograph featuring an individual person, who is then embellished with swirling strands of flowers, leaves, and vine-like lines. The brightly colored embroidery stands in contrast to the subdued grayscale tones of the photographs, highlighting the human figure while also standing alone as an eye-catching visual motif. Brant shares her work, interspersed with personal musings, on Instagram. (via I Need A Guide)

 

 



Photography

Aerial Explorations of International Cityscapes Washed in a Neon Glow by Xavier Portela

May 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

After a visit to Tokyo in 2014, self-taught photographer Xavier Portela became frustrated by how static and two-dimensional his images appeared. His photographs didn’t capture the emotions, acute stimulation of senses, or electric feeling one experiences while gliding through the bright lights of a foreign city with jet lag-induced insomnia. To explore this vibrancy and atmosphere Portela began to manipulate the colors in his images, amplifying their saturation to make each reflect what the brain remembered, but the original image couldn’t convey.

“When you are taking photographs on the streets you have way more than just a frame, you have variables like temperature, noise, people, smell,” Portela tells Colossal. “You have tons of details that make our senses and brain record a specific ‘scene’ of that moment. When you got home and you look at your photographs on screen, you only have a frame in two dimensions. It’s frustrating how much information you just lost… I wanted my shots to look like as if they came straight out of a manga. Vibrant and electric.”

Portela’s series Glow is an ongoing archive of urban images from his trips to Tokyo, Hong Kong, Bangkok, New York City, and more. Each photograph is edited with a wash of neon-inspired pink, blue, and purple lights. Although previous series have included photography taken on the street, more recently he has begun to produce aerial views of the sparkling cities below. You can see more images from the Belgo-Portuguese photographer and filmmaker on Instagram and Behance. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Photography

Afro Beauty Brought to Life in Photographer Luke Nugent’s Lavish Hair Portraiture

April 25, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

British photographer Luke Nugent captures a wide range of style, beauty, and personal expression in his creative photo shoots, for which he often works with London-based hair stylist Lisa Farrall. Nugent highlights women of color in his varied series, from the more subdued everyday styles in Emancipate to the Afrofuturism-inspired Armour, which was a finalist for the 2016 British Hair Awards.

Nugent studied photography at London’s University of Greenwich, and has been shooting professionally since his late teens. He creates work for a variety of commercial and editorial campaigns, with a focus on fashion, portraiture, and music. You can see more of his photography on his website, as well as Instagram and Behance. (via Scene360)

 

 

 



Art Photography

Handmade Textile Weeds and Other Overlooked Plants Printed With Found Images by Miranda van Dijk

April 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Sensitive Survivors

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Sensitive Survivors

Poet and textile artist Miranda van Dijk prints found images onto delicate faux floral arrangements made from canvas, cotton, or voile. The vintage images are transferred onto the textile plants using a digital printing technique, and are either hidden in the curve of a petal or are displayed prominently on one of the plant’s leaves. These works are then imbedded in a natural environment, allowing her sculptures to blend into wildflower gardens and other lush scenes.

For her series Sensitive Survivors, van Dijk modeled her pieces on twelve different forms of weeds. “Before the idea came up, I was obsessed by weeds,” the Dutch artist tells Colossal. “I saw them everywhere. Between my tiles in the garden, the playground. I found them so strong yet so fragile at the same time.”

Recently van Dijk published a book titled Sensitive Survivors (written in Dutch) which presents poetic connections between her handmade plants and the individuals printed on their forms. You can buy select pieces from Miranda van Dijk from her Etsy store, and learn about about her work on her website and Instagram. (via Anna Marks)

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Sensitive Survivors

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Sensitive Survivors

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Sensitive Survivors

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Sensitive Survivors

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Sensitive Survivors

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Sensitive Survivors

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Hidden Memories, photo by Oak&Fir

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Hidden Memories, photo by Oak&Fir

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Hidden Memories, photo by Oak&Fir

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Hidden Memories, photo by Oak&Fir

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Sensitive Survivors

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Sensitive Survivors

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Sensitive Survivors

Miranda van Dijk, from the series Sensitive Survivors