Photography

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Photography

Architecturally-Inspired Self-Portraits by Photography Duo Daniel Rueda and Anna Devís

December 13, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Self-taught photographers Daniel Rueda and Anna Devís play out their love affair with architecture on their Instagrams @drcuerda and @anniset, posing each other amongst unique geometric elements found in buildings across Europe. The pair are both architects by trade, and met while studying at university.

“Before starting at university I used to draw everything that came into my mind,” Devís explained in a video made by Adorama. “That process was very long so I decided to change the way to express them. That’s why I came into photography. It was quicker and it also made me happy.”

Their work started off with playful photoshoots that transformed into “creativity-driven minimalistic architectural self-portraits,” which is how they classify their playful photography.

“Neither of us can hide that it is us that we both love to take pictures of the most because we appear in each others’ pictures,” Rueda told Adorama. “I think the background is sometimes even more important that the main subject in the picture, that is why buildings and architecture are so important for my photography.”

You can watch a behind-the-scenes look into the couple’s artistic process in an interview with them in this video by Adorama.

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

 

 

 



Photography Science

Up-Close Images of Jupiter Reveal an Impressionistic Landscape of Swirling Gases

December 12, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Juno is NASA’s project focused on bringing a deeper understanding to Jupiter and the processes that might have governed our solar system’s creation. The spacecraft was launched in 2011 to explore several facets of the planet’s composition, including its atmosphere, magnetic force field, and dense cloud coverage.

This series of close-up photographs was taken by Juno within the last year, and is a dazzling diverse display of the planet’s gaseous composition. Swirling blue and brown clouds appear like impressionist paint strokes across Jupiter’s atmospheric surface, a spectacle which is constantly shifting into new optically charged formations.

You can see more images taken with Juno’s high-tech cameras on NASA’s website, and submit your own processed images from Juno’s raw image files on Mission Juno. (via Twisted Sifter)

     

 

 



Art Photography

Everyday Objects Obsessively Organized into Patterns by Adam Hillman

December 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

New Jersey-based “object arranger” Adam Hillman has really stepped up his organization efforts the last few months, pushing his precisely organized patterns of everyday objects into increasingly more complicated designs. Everything from breakfast cereal to office supplies finds its place in these tightly controlled symmetrical layouts that take hours to measure, cut, and arrange. Hillman now shares some of his best work as prints and you can follow him on Instagram.

 

 



Art Photography

Interactive LED Sculpture Projects Visitors’ Faces 14-Feet-Tall in Columbus, OH

December 7, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

As We Are is a 14-foot interactive sculpture by artist Matthew Mohr. The head-shaped work slowly rotates through a database of faces, displaying a range of Columbus residents and its visitors on 24 horizontal bands of LED screens. The monitors wrap nearly 360 degrees around the piece, leaving a gap for a photo studio where guests can pose for pictures that will be featured on work’s screens.

The sculpture is currently installed in the Greater Columbus Convention Center, a public venue primed for eager visitors who wish to see their faces projected more than two times their height. Its appearance reflects a few other body-centric public sculptures, namely David Cerny’s banded replication of Franz Kafka’s head in Prague, and Chicago’s Crown Fountain by Jaume Plensa which also displays a rotating cast of faces across a series of LED screens.

“‘As We Are’ presents Columbus as a welcoming, diverse culture where visitors and residents can engage on multiple levels through an interactive experience with public art,” says Mohr in an artist statement about the interactive structure. “It is an open-ended, conceptual piece that explores how we represent ourselves individually and collectively, asking participants to consider their identity in social media and in public. It asks all viewers to contemplate portraits of people from different ethnicities, and gender identities.”

Mohr also explains that the scale and location of the sculpture brings monumental recognition to each featured face, allowing the individual to be memorialized, if only for a few seconds. You can see more projects by the artist and Columbus College of Art and Design professor on his website, and view a video documenting several participants’ interactions with the sculpture below. (via Designboom)

 

 

 



Design History Photography

The Wild Architecture of Soviet-Era Bus Stops Photographed by Christopher Herwig

December 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Christopher Herwig has circled the former Soviet Union, exploring the most remote areas of Georgia, Russia, and Ukraine to find and photograph its unique bus stops. After the success of his first book Soviet Bus Stops, he decided to explore the subject matter again for his new follow-up collection Soviet Bus Stops Volume II. In this book Herwig focuses on Russia rather than its former Soviet counterparts, driving nearly 10,000 miles around the massive country finding its incredibly diverse transportation shelters.

These architectural forms are more deeply explored in a forward by architecture and culture critic Owen Hatherley, who details the government policies that have allowed the bus stops to remain. You can view more of the Jordan-based photographer’s work on his website and Vimeo. (via Design You Trust)

 

 



Amazing Photography Science

Transient: An Extraordinary Short Film That Captures Lightning at 1,000 Frames per Second

December 5, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Filmmaker and photographer Dustin Farrell spent over a month this summer traveling some 20,000 miles for the sole purpose of filming thunderstorms around the United States. Using a pricey Phantom Flex4K high-speed camera he filmed lightning strike after lightning strike at 1,000 frames per second, resulting in the impressive footage that shows the remarkable complexity of electricity in the atmosphere. Most of the footage in the final cut was shot around Farrell’s home state of Arizona.

“Lightning is like a snowflake. Every bolt is different,” shares Farrell. “I learned that lightning varies greatly in speed. There are some incredible looking bolts that I captured that didn’t make the cut because even at 1000fps they only lasted for one frame during playback. I also captured some lightning that appear computer generated it lasted so long on the screen.”

You can catch a few more of his short films here. (via PetaPixel)

 

 



Art Photography

Futuristic Portholes Capture the View from France’s Aging ‘Tours Aillaud’ Apartment Towers

December 5, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Series “Les Yeux des Tours” (2015 – 2017). Tours Aillaud, Nanterre, France. All images courtesy Laurent Kronental.

Eighteen towers filled with more than 1,600 apartments were built by architect Emile Aillaud between 1973 and 1981. The housing complex is found in the Pablo Picasso district of Nanterre, an inner suburb of Paris. The residential towers range from 7 to 38 floors, yet each share peculiar windows shaped like futuristic portholes. French photographer Laurent Kronental has long been fascinated by these windows and their towering hosts which serve as the subject of his 2015-2017 series Les Yeux de Tours.

Kronental shoots through these windows to capture the landscape that lies far below their sky-high positions. Many of the images in the series simply focus on the exterior view, while others include  a glimpse into the lives of residents. Curtains and bed linens hint at the owners’ aesthetic preferences, while a few photographs capture more telling objects such as pianos and dishware.

“The mundane and the magic intermesh and merge through the porthole that acts as a two-way eye, the window of a flying living room, of a spaceship galley,” explains a statement about Kronental’s series. The futuristic details built into the architecture are now elements of the past, yet their inhabitants still share the dream of a bright future. The more homely elements of their lives severely contrast the flashy design elements of the buildings’ exteriors, aging wallpaper set against the sleek skyscrapers that exist right outside.

Kronental’s work from his earlier series Souvenir d’un Futur will be exhibited in the group exhibition French Landscapes, a Photographic Experience (1984-2017) at the Bibliothèque François-Mitterrand in Paris through February 4, 2018. The exhibition includes more than 1,000 photographs from 160 artists in order to provide a diverse depiction of the French landscape as seen over the last 40 years. You can see more of Kronental’s work on his website and Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)